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Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
of trying to join the state department, i moved to los angeles and work apprentice for years. documentary filmmakers, always non-fiction. people make documentaries, usually come at it with a variety of backgrounds. very few of us took the film route. you need investigative sense and patience and you need to be a good listener, persuasive and have an ear for material. host: how many hours did you shoot? guest: too many, 5er hundred hour on this -- hundred hours on this one. rachael and i met in new york. we were working for another producer. we were asked to produce a two hour tv special on the church of scientology. nobody wanted to make the film because i think people were afraid of the church of scientology. we did it and it was a fascinating experience. we met on that film and in 2001 we started films in new york city our own production company. host: more from "detropia." who named it? guest: i did. host: when did you get that? guest: couple weeks before sunday. we didn't have a title. we opened up film up sunday in january. it needed a title. we couldn't figure out what to call
to chicago or new york or philadelphia or los angeles, can't afford it because they're not finding employment. a place like detroit, it's a place that needs them. they can sort of make a mark. they can live for super cheap. they can have a loft. they can mingle with other people. there is a community growing. very specific neighborhoods and midtown detroit. it's become a trendy thing. i don't know if it's a trend that will be long term. >> you said you grew up in farmington hills. what's that like and how far is it from downtown detroit? >> 25 or 30 minute drive. i grew up 5 miles from the city limit of detroit. i group. on 12-mile. it's a world away. it's got suburban, lofts and box tours and coffee shops. it's decent public schools. interesting when i grow up mostly caucasian people there, all the caucasian people there are mixed now. which is a good thing. partly because the black middle class made an exit out of detroit and made it into the suburbs. most people that could leave have left. >> why should detroit be saved? why there should be a lot of money pumped in there? >> i don't thin
wanted to do more. by shifting half of the program, one of the hosts, some of the los angeles -- angele ever colleagues in california are on a screen at their own table 3,000 miles away talking. they have a different perspective on things. things that seem important to us in washington seem irrelevant there. the reverse can be true. it is great to have a conversation back and forth. correspondents based in places like chicago, we have full time people in new orleans for a couple of years after katrina, and having people in different places just really enriches the conversation and the range of stories you can do. >> one of your radio reports, so people can hear you, this is on the road. we will find out afterward. [video clip] i am standing on the ruins of carthage. this city was the capital of an empire, destroyed by the romans more than 2000 years ago and rebuilt before it fell into ruin again. what we see are a couple of stone columns and the foundations of ancient buildings. we came here to begin a journey along the coast line through libya, egypt, and we are watching as nations reb
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)